Survey on AE members expertise in environmental and climate issues

Academia Europaea has recently established a Task Force on Environment, Climate, and Sustainability issues. A recently issued survey, sent to all members and with a completion deadline of January 14th, is intended to map members expertise and engagement in these fields.

The Academia Europaea Task Force on Environment, Climate, and Sustainability issues.

The Academia Europaea Task Force on Environment, Climate, and Sustainability issues.

In 2021 Academia Europaea (AE) has established a Task Force to provide plans for extending its engagement and visibility in the areas of environment, climate, and sustainability under the leadership of Professor Verena Winiwarter. This will be an important tool to better align Academia Europaea with some of the most pressing global challenges. The Bergen Hub is responsible for organising this activity on behalf of Academia Europaea.

In addition to Winiwarter, the Task Force of eight AE members consists of Carlo Carraro, Jane Hill, Patricia Holm. Poul Holm (Deputy Chair), Eystein Jansen, Nebojsa Nakicenuvic and Peter Wagner.

Mapping relevant knowledge within AE

The objective of the Task Force is to identify a range of critical questions relating to climate and environmental change research that carry a clearly significant societal and/or policy dimension and that can realistically be addressed with confidence by the application of AE expert knowledge from across the membership.

As a first step, the Task Force wishes to gain a better understanding of the range of relevant knowledge within AE as well as the availability of members for participation in AE initiatives on these. To get the best possible overview of the expert knowledge within the AE, a survey is provided and sent to all members. Deadline for responding to this survey is January 14th.

The survey serves the double purpose of gaining information and enabling communication. It should take less than 15 minutes to answer the basic questions of the survey.
If you have expertise and/or engagement in environment, climate, and sustainability issues, we hope that you will respond to the survey from this link.

 

Our Hub is organizing an Arctic Frontiers side event on deep sea minerals

Norway is in a position to become a leader in the exploration for deep-sea minerals. The race has started, rich in challenges, opportunities, and dilemmas. This is the subject of a side event co-organized by the AE-Bergen Knowledge Hub and UiB, at the Arctic Frontiers 2022 Conference

Vast quantities of metal-rich mineral deposits have been found in areas of the deep sea including deep sea regions of the Arctic and sub-Arctic.

Vast quantities of metal-rich mineral deposits have been found in areas of the deep sea including deep sea regions of the Arctic and sub-Arctic.

The green transition generates a need for critical minerals that is expected to be greater than the supply from the existing land-based mining industry and recycling. Vast quantities of metal-rich mineral deposits have been found in areas of the deep sea including deep sea regions of the Arctic and sub-Arctic.

This has catalysed the development of technologies to extract resources necessary for The Green Shift. While the International Seabed Authority (ISA) has granted exploration licenses in various locations, in particular in the Pacific Ocean, several countries are planning to initiate exploration within their own jurisdiction. Norway being one of them.

Sustainable enough to be justified?

Does the Green Shift really need deep-sea minerals? Do deep-sea minerals have a potential for creating new industries? Is the technology advanced enough? Do we have the knowledge base needed to safely explore these resources without irreversible damage to surrounding ecosystems?

How is Norway preparing for its 1st licensing round for deep-sea minerals, and how will this influence the arctic regions? Is the Norwegian Act on Mineral Activities on the Continental Shelf (Seabed Minerals Act) a sufficient regulatory framework? And finally; can deep-sea mineral extraction be sustainable enough to be justified?

As you can see, this topic is brimming with interesting questions. We’re calling the event “Race to the (seabed) bottom – realities and sustainability dilemmas in the demand for minerals”. Several interesting panelists are already confirmed, such as Dr, Karen Hanghøj, Director of The British Geological Survey, and Pedro A. Ribeiro, a leading researcher in this field at UiB.

Arctic Frontiers 2022 Pathways will be a hybrid conference, and our side event is scheduled for Tuesday February 1th, at 11:00-12:15.

 

 

 

AE-Bergen Knowledge Hub strengthens cooperation with Norwegian Academies

The autumn of 2021 has seen the AE-Bergen Knowledge Hub strengthen its cooperation with Norwegian Science Academies. This has taken place in the form of our participation in meetings with all Norwegian Academies. In addition, we have been a partner with NTVA on a local lecture series.

AE-Bergen Knowledge Hub collaborated with Tekna and NTVA on a local lecture series this autumn. Here Kjell Herfjord from Tekna and Jarl Giske from NTVA at one of the events.

AE-Bergen Knowledge Hub collaborated with Tekna and NTVA on a local lecture series this autumn. Here Kjell Herfjord from Tekna and Jarl Giske from NTVA at one of the events.

The meeting with all Norwegian science academies resulted in a shared understanding of several areas of common interest. Several of the Norwegian academies work to advance science advice, and to establish a Science Advice Mechanism in Norway.

One other area where the academies discussed collaboration, is the possibility of joint opinions for national hearings. Most academies write their own statements for national hearings today, but these could have greater weight if Norwegian academies united behind them. Cooperation in communication efforts was also discussed.

Local lecture series

Another successful collaboration this autumn, has been our collaboration with NTVA (technical sciences) as partner for a local lecture series, with Tekna as another collaboration partner. Subjects have been future healthcare solutions, sustainable shipping, and technical challenges in building the world’s longest floating bridge.

AE-Bergen Hub’s academic director Eystein Jansen.

AE-Bergen Hub’s academic director Eystein Jansen.

The Hub’s academic director Eystein Jansen comments:

– Science Academies have several common interests. We all do important work in science advice for policy and work to advance interdisciplinarity, as well as advancing the international orientation of science. The AE-Bergen Knowledge Hub looks forward to cooperating with Norwegian academies on these topics in the future, Eystein Jansen says.

Time travel and climate: recorded event

What would you do if you invented a time machine? Would you travel back to the past, to alter history or fix mistakes? Or would you rather jump forward, to collect future knowledge and bring back advanced technologies?

These and other challenging questions were asked of two of Europe’s top experts on climate change and energy: Professor Nebojsa Nakicenovic, Chief Scientific Advisor to the European Commission, and Professor Peter Lund, co-chair of the SAPEA working group on Europe’s energy transition, at an event co-hosted by SAPEA during Berlin Science Week.

How did we get ourselves into such a mess with climate change? When and how did it all go wrong — and could we have done otherwise? What information about the future do we need to help guide our energy choices now? And how do today’s scientists model tomorrow’s world without the aid of a time machine?

The recorded event is available here.

Two of Europe’s top experts on climate change and energy: Professor Nebojsa Nakicenovic, Chief Scientific Advisor to the European Commission, and Professor Peter Lund, co-chair of the SAPEA working group on Europe’s energy transition.

Two of Europe’s top experts on climate change and energy: Professor Nebojsa Nakicenovic, Chief Scientific Advisor to the European Commission, and Professor Peter Lund, co-chair of the SAPEA working group on Europe’s energy transition.

 

 

2021 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to three members of Academia Europaea

The Nobel Prize 2021 in in Physics was awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences “for ground-breaking contributions to our understanding of complex physical systems”, to three members of Academia Europaea.

Professor Syukuro Manabe MAE, Professor Klaus Hasselmann MAE, and Professor Giorgio Parisi MAE

Professor Syukuro Manabe MAE, Professor Klaus Hasselmann MAE, and Professor Giorgio Parisi MAE.

The membership of the AE is delighted to congratulate our longstanding members Professor Syukuro Manabe, who was elected to the Earth and Cosmic Sciences section in 1994, Professor Klaus Hasselmann, one of the founding members of the Academy and member since 1988, elected to the Earth and Cosmic Sciences section, and Professor Giorgio Parisi who was elected to the Physics and Engineering Sciences section in 2009.

Professor Paolo Papale, the Chair of the Earth and Cosmic Sciences section writes:

“Prof. Syukuro Manabe and Prof. Klaus Hasselmann, both members of the Earth and Cosmic Sciences section of the Academia Europaea, are co-winners of the Nobel Prize in physics for their “physical modelling of the Earth’s climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming.

The Academia Europaea expresses its most sincere congratulations to them, for such an achievement crowning extraordinary brilliant careers in science.”

Professor Pavel Exner, the Chair of the Physics and Engineering Sciences section writes:

“The AE Physics & Engineering Section is proud that its member, Professor Giorgio Parisi, was awarded today the Nobel Prize for Physics. The citation says that he was honoured “for the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales”. This brief description included a number of brilliant results in quantum field theory, statistical mechanics and dynamics complex systems concerning, for instance, QCD evolution equations for parton densities known by the names of Altarelli and Parisi, the exact solution of the Sherrington–Kirkpatrick model of spin glasses, or the Kardar–Parisi–Zhang equation describing dynamic scaling of growing interfaces. He also managed to explain effects both common and unusual, such as the whirling behaviour of starling flocks. Our sincere congratulations, Giorgio!”

This is the second time in two years that Academy members were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics: Roger Penrose and Reinhard Genzel in 2020, Syukuro Manabe, Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi in 2021.

Transitioning to new energy systems: recorded webinar

On 11 October, an international audience of 150 people joined our panel of experts to discuss the impact that moving away from fossil fuels to new energy sources may have on our lives.

This online event was organised by SAPEA (Science Advice for Policy by European Academies) and Academia Europaea. You’ll find an overview of the webinar and key points from the speakers below..

Overview
Energy transition is not just about new technologies and innovation. Our current lifestyles are also contributing to energy and climate problems, and the move away from fossil fuels towards different energy systems will impact on everyone in society.

Our panel of experts

Our panel of experts

Change has to be fair and inclusive. It requires public engagement and active participation across the whole of society. Addressing these issues is even more important given the context of the upcoming global climate conference, COP26, and Europe’s goal to meet net zero emission of greenhouse gases by 2050.

This webinar, chaired and moderated by Professor Ole Petersen MAE, Vice-President of Academia Europaea, saw our panel of experts discuss these critical issues and answer questions from the audience.

Speakers
Professor Nebojsa Nakicenovic MAE, Deputy Chair of the European Commission’s Group of Chief Scientific Advisors, provided the context for the webinar with an overview of the Scientific Opinion on ‘A systemic approach to the energy transition in Europe’ and highlighted its important message of “leaving no one behind”.

Our next two speakers were SAPEA Energy Working Group Members – Professor Diana Urge-Vorsatz MAE, Director of the Center for Climate Change and Sustainable Energy Policy, Central European University; and Professor Benjamin Sovacool MAE, Professor of Energy Policy, University of Sussex. Using the SAPEA Evidence Review Report as a starting point, Professor Urge-Vorsatz discussed the inequalities in emissions across Europe and the value of avoided energy use. Professor Sovacool focused on the impact simple behaviour changes can have and the importance of balancing technological innovation and behaviour change for low-carbon transition.

Professor Nick Pidgeon, Professor of Environmental Psychology and Risk, Cardiff University, emphasised how involving the whole of society will be critical in the energy transition and that successful behaviour change approaches to reduce energy consumption will require elements such as good communications, infrastructure change and investment, and that regulation may also be needed.

Professor Eystein Jansen MAE, Professor of Earth Sciences / Paleoclimatology, University of Bergen and Member of the Scientific Council of the European Research Council, referred to the recent IPCC report and the sense of urgency to act on climate change. He described the challenges he saw ahead, expressing his concern that by setting goals for net zero emission of greenhouse gases by 2050, we may postpone necessary short-term actions, given that emissions need go down now.

Lise Øvreås is the new president of the DNVA

Professor Lise Øvreås has been elected new president of The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. She will be the third woman to hold this top position.

Lise Øvreås is the new president of the DNVA

Lise Øvreås is the new president of the DNVA. Photo: Eivind Senneset/UiB

Lise Øvreås is Professor of Geomicrobiology and Director of the Center for Sustainable Seas at the University of Bergen (UiB), and Professor II at UNIS. She has broad management experience and a strong national and international career.

– I greatly appreciate being elected president of the Academy, and I look forward to taking part in its further development, says Øvreås.

In her election speech, she mentioned sustainable change, scientific advice, and the promotion of free and independent research as some of her flagship issues for the Academy in the future.

Sustainability, the sea, and academia

Øvreås is educated at UiB and has, among other things, been vice dean for research at the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences. As director of Ocean Sustainability Bergen, scientific advice and the UN’s sustainability goals are two of her fields of experience.

She has been a member of the Academy of Sciences since 2013 and has previously been a board member and vice president. She represents Norway in the European Academy Science Advisory Council (EASAC) and is a member of the National Committee for the Year of Marine Research.

UiB Rector Margareth Hagen congratulates Lise Øvreås on an important position:

– The Academy of Sciences plays an important role in promoting science both in Norway and internationally, and Lise Øvreås, with her background in ocean and sustainability, is the right person to lead the academy further, says Hagen.

Third woman since 1857

Øvreås joins the leadership position in January 2022 and is elected for three years. She takes over from Hans-Petter Graver, UiO, who has been president since 2019. The president is also chairman of the board.

Øvreås is the third woman among 48 leaders in the Academy of Sciences since 1857. Her predecessors have been Professor Inger Moen (1998-2003) and Professor Kirsti Strøm Bull (2012-2015), both from the University of Oslo.

You can read this article, written by Åshild Nylund, in Norwegian here.

 

 

We must make sure that today’s solutions don’t become tomorrow’s problems

The publication of the first findings of the sixth IPCC climate report coincided with the start of the Norwegian regional conference  Rosendalsveko (August 9th – 11th). For the young participants at the conference, the dire findings of the report and warnings of a “code red for the planet” came as no surprise.

Climate Research

Silje Skjelsvik, founder of “About Tomorrow”, Vår Dundas (PhD-student at Uib) Lise Tenold (student, NHH Norwegian School of Economics), Sigurd Melkenborg Salvesen (Student parliament at UiB).

The contrast from the beautiful natural surroundings by the Hardangerfjord in western Norway in full summer glory, to the warnings of the IPCC climate report, was keenly felt. The surrounding areas experience consequences such as the glacier melting now deemed unstoppable, of the nearby glacier Folgefonna.

New this year at the climate conference Rosendalsveko, are the additional sessions in the weekend leading up to the conference, in the form of a youth camp devoted to climate issues and interdisciplinary efforts for a greener future. Many participants here stayed for the main conference, creating extra awareness of the urgency of the issues. Central to this initial weekend of the conference, is the student organization “Om i morgen”, in English “About Tomorrow”.

Responsible utilization of the coastline

– We want to make sure that today’s solutions don’t become tomorrow’s problems. Sustainability issues are even more of a pressing area for the younger generations, says Silje Skjelsvik, founder of “About Tomorrow”.

As a climate scientist, she is not surprised that the findings of the sixth IPCC climate report paint an even bleaker picture of the health of the planet, with a connection between the increasing severity of natural disasters and temperature rise from human activity confirmed by the report.

Sigurd Melkenborg Salvesen was one of the participants at the youth camp who decided to stay for the whole conference.

– Rosendalsveko has proved to be a great meeting place for people to discuss sustainability issues. For me it was particularly interesting to follow the sessions on responsible utilization of the coastline in western Norway, as well as sessions looking at how interdisciplinarity can further sustainability efforts, Sigurd Melkenborg Salvesen says.

Like the rest of the group, he hopes that the youth camp leading up to the conference (to which the AE-Bergen Knowledge Hub is a contributor), will become a permanent fixture of the Rosendal Week.

Broad perspective on sustainability issues

For the young participants, it is important to have as broad a perspective as possible on sustainability issues.

Vakre Rosendal dannet rammen for andre årgang av klimakonferansen Rosendalsveko.

Vakre Rosendal dannet rammen for andre årgang av klimakonferansen Rosendalsveko.

– Some of the environmentally friendly solutions come at a cost. Today battery technology is one of the central alternatives to fossil fuels in the transport sector, but battery production can have a significant carbon footprint. If solar or wind energy is a viable alternative in the area of production, it should be utilised. Looking at all the alternatives with a broad perspective is necessary in finding tomorrows green solutions, Silje Skjelsvik says.

Situated in Rosendal by the Hardangerfjord in western Norway, the place itself serves as reminder of the value of nature and is thus an ideal place for a climate conference. Regional businesses help organize the event along with The Folgefonna outreach Centre, the Institute for Marine Research and the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research. Several of the sessions touched on topics concerning interaction between business and academia to further sustainable solutions.

Vestlandet i et globalt perspektiv

I panelet Silje Skjelsvik, Pinar Heggernes, Ole R. Øvretveit og Tore Furevik. Debatten ble ledet av vitenskapelig leder i AE-Bergen, Eystein Jansen.

I panelet Silje Skjelsvik, Pinar Heggernes, Ole R. Øvretveit og Tore Furevik. Debatten ble ledet av vitenskapelig leder i AE-Bergen, Eystein Jansen.

Årets Rosendalsveko (9. – 11. august), med overskriften «Klima, energi, næring og bærekraft på Vestlandet» ble avsluttet med en paneldebatt over temaet «Vestlandet i et globalt perspektiv», et tema som også sammenfatter mange av diskusjonene fra konferansen som helhet.

Den avsluttende debatten ble ledet av vitenskapelig leder i AE-Bergen, Eystein Jansen. Se opptak av paneldebatten her. Den aktuelle debatten starter ved 01.02.30 inn i opptaket.

– Vestlandet har gode forutsetninger for å ta en ledende rolle i det grønne skiftet, gjennom verdensledende forskningsmiljøer innen klima- og havforskning, vi har naturlige forutsetninger innen det marine og det maritime, og vi har levende industriklynger. Alt dette må bygges videre på dersom Vestlandet skal holde på sin posisjon, sa Eystein Jansen som innledning til debatten.

Vakre Rosendal dannet rammen for andre årgang av klimakonferansen Rosendalsveko.

Vakre Rosendal dannet rammen for andre årgang av klimakonferansen Rosendalsveko.

Panelet bestod av Silje Skjelsvik, gründer og initiativtaker til studentorganisasjonen «Om i morgen», Pinar Heggernes, prorektor ved UiB, Ole R. Øvretveit, daglig leder i tankesmien Initiativ Vest, og Tore Furevik, direktør ved Nansensenteret for miljø og fjernmåling.

Noen av hovedpunktene fra panelet:

Silje Skjelsvik: Vi må sørge for at dagens løsninger ikke blir morgendagens problemer. Da må vi flytte subsidier fra fossil energi og over til fornybar energi. Verden vil ikke klare å begrense den globale oppvarmingen til under 2 grader, om ikke Vestland klarer det. La oss se det grønne skiftet med mulighetsbrillene på.

Pinar Heggernes: Nye teknologier kan være gode verktøy på veien mot en grønnere fremtid, i en region som alltid har vært internasjonalt orientert og der næringslivet viser evne til endring. Våre forskere driver med langsiktig forskning og ser på de lange linjene. Universitetet i Bergen har kontaktnett inn mot de beste forskningsmiljøene internasjonalt, og det kan også næringslivet dra nytte av.

Vestlandet i et globalt perspektiv»

Temaet «Vestlandet i et globalt perspektiv» sammenfattet mange av diskusjonene fra konferansen som helhet.

Ole R. Øvretveit: IPPC-rapporten, eller klimapanelets 6. hovedrapport, ble et utropstegn som viser at verden har dårlig tid. Oljeavhengigheten vår hemmer omstillingen. Verdens kapitalmarkeder blir stadig mer skeptiske til olje- og gass som investeringsobjekt. Oljeavhengigheten gir ikke bare et klimaproblem, men blir i økende grad også en økonomisk risiko. Omstillingen vil koste, også politisk. Vi har likevel gode kort på hånden, gjennom sterke teknologimiljøer og høy bærekrafts-kompetanse.

Tore Furevik: Et sentralt element for å få til det grønne skiftet er gode rammevilkår. Regionen vår har massevis av kompetanse, men denne benyttes i altfor stor grad til oljerelatert virksomhet. Fjorårets oljeskattepakke, og det at forskningsmidler fortsatt går til petroleumsforskning, bidrar til å binde opp de gode hodene i oljevirksomhet heller enn i omstilling. Jeg tror ikke på at begreper som flyskam, kjøttskam og dieselskam vil redde klimaet, slike begreper gir kun polarisering og støy. Samtidig må det bli dyrere å forurense, og det må bli enklere å leve miljøvennlig.

 

Ny «ungdoms-camp» innleder årets Rosendalsveko

Rosendalsveko går av stabelen for andre gang 9. – 11. august, med «Klima, energi, næring og bærekraft på Vestlandet» som hovedtema. I år er arrangementet utvidet med Rosendalshelga i forkant av uken.

Rosendalsveko arrangeres for andre gang i år, innledet av nykommeren Rosendalshelga, som kan beskrives som en "student-camp".

Rosendalsveko arrangeres for andre gang i år, innledet av nykommeren Rosendalshelga, som kan beskrives som en “student-camp”. Her fra arrangement i fjor. Foto: Kerim Hestnes Nisancioglu.

– Det vi så i fjor, var at noen av de mest spennende diskusjonene kom når studenter utfordret politikere, næringsliv og akademikere. Derfor legger vi i år opp til en helg for studentene i forkant av uken, i samarbeid med studentorganisasjonen Om i morgen.

Kerim Hestnes Nisancioglu leder Rosendalsveko. Til daglig er han klimaforsker ved UiB/Bjerknes.

Kerim Hestnes Nisancioglu leder Rosendalsveko. Til daglig er han klimaforsker ved UiB/Bjerknes.

Temaene de jobber med i helgen vil de øvrige deltakerne bli utfordret på under første dag av Rosendalsveko, forklarer programkomiteens Kerim Hestnes Nisancioglu (til daglig klimaforsker ved UiB/Bjerknes).

Studentorganisasjonen Om i morgen har selv lagt opp programmet for Rosendalshelga. Tema for workshop’en lørdag er «Hvordan kan vi best utnytte den lange kystlinjen vår?» (kan bli endret). Dette skal resultere i konkrete løsningsforslag.

Både Academia Europaea Bergen Knowledge Hub (AE-Bergen) og UiB er bidragsytere til Rosendalsveko. Bidraget fra AE-Bergen går spesifikt til Rosendalshelga og deltakelse for studentene fra Om i morgen.

Studentene vil utfordre

– Jeg er overbevist om at når studentene har jobbet med tema rundt det grønne skiftet i helgen, så vil de finne gode problemstillinger som utfordrer politikere, næringsliv og akademikere, legger Kerim Hestnes til.

– Et av temaene våre er «Lykkes Vestlandet – lykkes Norge». Jeg mener virkelig at ressursene og aktiviteten på Vestlandet tilsier at det faktisk er slik om Vestlandet lykkes, så lykkes Norge. Dersom vi finner de bærekraftige løsningene så vil vår tilgang på kraft og ressurser gjøre at vi kan lede an i det grønne skiftet.

Panelsamtalen «Vestlandet i et globalt perspektiv» blir moderert av vitenskapelig leder i AE-Bergen, Eystein Jansen. Debatten foregår på avsluttende dag av Rosendalsveko, onsdag 11. august.

Panelsamtalen «Vestlandet i et globalt perspektiv» blir moderert av vitenskapelig leder i AE-Bergen, Eystein Jansen.

– At Rosendalsveko retter seg mot både politikere, næringsliv og akademia gjør at det kan ligge et godt kunnskapsgrunnlag bak våre løsningsforslag, og det trenger vi studentene til å hjelpe oss med, sier Kerim Hestnes.

Panelsamtalen «Vestlandet i et globalt perspektiv» blir moderert av vitenskapelig leder i AE-Bergen, Eystein Jansen. Blant paneldeltakerne er Margareth Hagen, rektor ved UiB. Debatten foregår på avsluttende dag av Rosendalsveko, onsdag 11. august.

Studentorganisasjonen Om i morgen ble startet i 2019 ved mat-nat fakultetet ved UiB, med studenter på klima, atmosfære og havfysikk som initiativtakere. Etter hvert har medlemsmassen blitt mye mer tverrfaglig. Nå er det også studenter fra blant annet sammenliknende politikk, psykologi, juss og økonomi i tillegg til naturvitenskapelige fagfelt med i Om i morgen.

Tore Furevik i samtale Silje Skjelsvik fra Om i morgen under Rosendalsveko i fjor.

Tore Furevik i samtale Silje Skjelsvik fra Om i morgen under Rosendalsveko i fjor.

Liv Svenningsson Krogstad og Tilda Totland Persson i Om i morgen mener at tverrfagligheten har blitt en styrke for organisasjonen.

– Tverrfaglighet gir oss mulighet til å jobbe hverandre gode på områder man kanskje ikke er så godt kjent med i utgangspunktet. Det gjør at vi får inn ulike meninger og bakgrunner som vi kan ta med i videre arbeid. Den viktigste kilden til erfaring og læring er å delta i organisasjoner som jobber med det du engasjerer deg i, sier Tilda Totland Persson.

Medlemmene i Om i morgen har selv lagt opp programmet for Rosendalshelga.

Tilda Totland Persson Liv Svenningsson Krogstad i Om i morgen har vært med å lage programmet for Rosendalshelga.

Tilda Totland Persson Liv Svenningsson Krogstad i Om i morgen har vært med å lage programmet for Rosendalshelga.

– Vi har lagt vekt på at deltakerne skal lære noe og dra fra Rosendal med kunnskap og ideer, samt utfordre seg selv til å finne løsninger på klimautfordringer. Vi synes også det er viktig at deltakerne har det kjekt sosialt, og får tid til å bli kjent med hverandre og knytte nettverk. Programmet består blant annet av innlegg fra Renate Nedregård (ny leder i Klimapartnere Vestland) og Kerim Hestnes Nisancioglu, forklarer Liv og Tilda.

De tror at mange av ungdommene fra helge-campen vil få med seg flere av arrangementene også når selve Rosendalsveko begynner på mandagen.